Skullgirls/General/Glossary

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System Specific Glossaries

Move Properties

Cancel and Movement Properties

Term / Symbol Definition
Airdashcancel.png An attack (other than a normal move) that can be canceled to an air dash during the recovery frames.
Airok.png Special moves and Blockbusters that can be performed on the ground or in the air have this property.
Aironly.png Special moves and Blockbusters that can only be performed in the air have this property.
Chains Down Normals with this property will chain chain to any other normal of lesser strength. Going down in a chain combo will start a new chain for IPS when hitting with the lower normal.
Chains Twice Many characters have moves that can be chained into themselves, but only for two hits. Moves with this property are the only normal moves that can cancel their recovery with a normal move on whiff. Some moves Chain Thrice.
Ensemble Only A special move that can only be used as an Ensemble attack. Even when using the custom Ensemble input during a match, the point character will not perform the move!
Flight Cancel A special or super move that can be canceled into Flight during the recovery frames. This property is exclusive to Painwheel.
Jcancel.png These special attacks can cancel to a jump on hit, much like a Launch.png normal attack.
Nocancel.png These attacks have some additional restriction on their cancel properties. A normal move that can't cancel to a special move or a special move that can't cancel to a Blockbuster would have this property.
Rpdfire.png These moves will chain into themselves any number of times with rapid button presses.
Sekhmet! Eliza's Sekhmet attacks actually belong to Sekhmet; the player must have direct control of Sekhmet to perform these techniques.
Target Chain These normal attacks will chain cancel to another normal outside of the character's standard chain combos. Using a target chain will not start a new chain for IPS.

Hit Properties

Term Definition
Airthrow.png Air throws are unblockable attacks that deal damage during an uninterruptable animation on hit. All air throws must be preformed during a jump and cannot hit opponents on the ground. All characters have a normal air throw (air LP+LK) and some have special move or Blockbuster air throws.
Anti-Air Throw These variations on a Throwonhit.png are all performed from the ground and attempt to grab an airborne opponent. They will not hit a standing or crouching opponent, but become unblockable when the opponent has upward momentum early in a jump.
Hatred Guard Painwheel's exclusive property for her chargeable, armored, and damage reflecting normal moves.
High.png For a defending character on the ground, high moves must be blocked while standing (←).
Low.png For a defending character on the ground, low moves must be blocked while crouching (↙).
Throw.png Throws are unblockable attacks that deal damage during an uninterruptable animation on hit. All air throws must be preformed from standing and cannot hit opponents in the air or while starting their jump. All characters have a normal ground throw (LP+LK) and some have special move or Blockbuster throws.
Throwonhit.png These Throw.png attacks are blockable, but still deal damage during an uninterruptable animation on hit. Only special moves and Blockbusters have this property and, unlike other throws, will connect on a defending player in hit or block stun.

Hit Effects

Term Definition
Armored.png Armored moves can absorb one or more hits during their start up and active frames. Attacks absorbed by armor are reduced by 50%, will still count towards a combo, and are subject to damage scaling. Throw.png , Sweep.png , and Outtake can break through armor.
Avery! Moves that spawn Avery will cause an existing Avery on screen to disappear. Avery can only be in one place at a time. This property only concerns Peacock and Double's moves stolen from Peacock.
Cptr.png On hit, these attacks start a Throw.png animation that do not give the opponent any vulnerable frames. Hitting the defending player during the capture animation will interrupt the attack.
Cinematic A property that causes some Blockbusters to trigger a unique animation on hit that cannot be canceled, even by a Blockbuster Sequel. Cinematic Blockbusters freeze the timer and will not kill an opponent until the last hit of the attack.
Crumple.png On hit, this Knockdown.png causes the defending character to fall down from standing in an extended stun then get up with a default recovery animation. Falling completely to the ground counts as a Knockdown.png . A crumple stun used in a combo after Knockdown.png will give opponents complete invulnerability as soon as their knees touch the floor.
Groundbounce.png If an an attack with ground bounce connects, it causes the opponent to to slam into the ground and bounce into the air. The ground bounce leaves the defending player stunned until it causes a Knockdown.png . Some attacks will cause ground bounce only against an aerial opponent.
Hardknockdown.png This Knockdown.png will always force the opponent to get up with a default recovery animation. Crumple.png and Slide.png stun can also force the opponent to get up without a ground recovery, but can only be used to full effect once per combo.
Ignites Tears And attack with a flame effect that detonates Krieg's explosive tears on contact. This property is exclusive to Parasoul.
Knockdown.png Knockdown always force the opponent to the ground on hit. Air attacks that cause knockdown will often spike the opponent directly down and can never force the opponents to land on their feet in hit stun. A knockdown will leave the defending player vulnerable to getting hit OTG Once Per Combo. The second knockdown allows an immediate ground recovery.
Launch.png Launchers are normal moves that send the opponent in an upwards direction on hit and can cancel to a super jump. All characters have at least one launcher.
Level 1 Blockbuster This move is a level 1 Blockbuster: it costs 1 stock of Dramatic Tension, causes a super flash, and has all of the other appropriate qualities of a Blockbuster. Level 2, 3, and 5 Blockbusters will respectively cost 2, 3, or 5 levels of meter.
Once Per Combo This move will only apply a unique hit effect only the first time it is used in a combo. Additional uses of the same move in a combo can have less damage, less hit stun, or a different knockdown effect.
Proj.png An attack that appears as an independent on object on the screen. Projectiles typically disappear if the attacking character gets hit.
Projectilereflect.png These attacks attempt to negate an enemy projectile during their active frames. If successful, they send a projectile back to the opponent.
Slide.png Attacks that cause slide stun will Knockdown.png and force the opponent to travel across the floor. This extended animation never allows the defending character to use a ground recovery. Some attacks will cause a slide only against an aerial opponent. If a knockdown and OTG has already been used in a combo before a slide stun, the opponent will complete the sliding animation with invulnerable frames.
Softknockdown.png Unlike a regular Knockdown.png , these attacks always give the opponent an immediate ground recovery. Hitting an opponent OTG is not possible after a soft knockdown.
Sound Stun Attacks with this property give some of Big Band's attacks a longer stun effect when used for the first time in a combo, usually by adding a lengthy hit stop that only affects the defending character. Any additional hits with Sound Stun in the same combo will cause a lesser stun. Because it can only be used Once Per Combo, the property is analogous to a character specific Stagger.png . Without the property many Sound Stun attacks will cause Sweep.png knockdown and immediately end the combo.
Stagger.png These attacks cause a stagger stun on hit Once Per Combo. The unique animation allows the defending player to shorten the stun with rapid directional inputs such as spinning or shaking the joystick.
Startupinv.png These moves have invulnerable frames of animation during start up or active periods. They often go through oncoming attacks when used as a reversal and make for excellent Ensembles.
Strk.png These attacks will knock a standing or crouching opponent into the air. They do not cause a Knockdown.png and the defending character will recover in the air before landing.
Sweep.png These normal moves, typically with the the same (↓+HK) command for every character, are all Low.png and cause a unique Knockdown.png on hit. This knockdown gives the opponent invulnerability until touching the ground and an immediate ground recovery on the first bounce, so continuing a combo after a sweep is impossible unless the defending player forgets to do an input for the recovery. Sweep attacks do not cause their unique knockdown when hitting as an OTG.
Wallbounce.png Sends the defending character backwards in hit stun to bounce off of the side of the screen, then causes a Knockdown.png . If the opponent doesn't make it to a wall they go through a brief Slide.png stun when they hit the ground. Some attacks will cause wall bounce only against an aerial opponent.
Wall Splat Sends the opponent to the side of the screen for a bounce effect that forces a fall to the ground at a set distance for the Knockdown.png . While the Wallbounce.png depends on screen position, defending characters keep their backs to the corner when falling from a wall splat.

Vocabulary Reference

General Fighting Game Terms

These terms are all common to fighting games. Skullgirls and this guide use them freely.

Term Definition
Active The portion of any attack with attack boxes, or when the attack can actually hit an opponent.
Anchor The last character on a team, expected to be able to fight with no teammates left alive.
Assist A technique where the point character calls a teammate to the screen for an attack. Assists are called Ensembles in Skullgirls.
Attack Box The hit boxes for an attack that register a hit when overlapping with an opponent.
Battery A character who gains Dramatic Tension and never uses it, saving it for a teammate instead.
Command grab A special move or Blockbuster throw.
Command normal Any standing, crouching, or jumping attack preformed with a simultaneous attack button and single direction input.
Cross-over Any attack made while switching sides with an opponent over their head, forcing a change in block direction.
Cross-under Any attack made while passing under and switching sides with an aerial opponent, forcing a change in block direction.
Fireball Synonymous with a projectile, usually one that travels horizontally across the screen.
Grab Synonymous with throw.
Grappling A style of play, specific to the player or the character, that centers around constantly threatening the opponent with high damage throws.
Green Bar A reference to a completely full life bar, which confirms a perfect round for the winning team.
Hard Tag Using a tag out at an unexpected, likely unsafe time in an attempt to save a low health character. The only way SoCal knows how to win games.
Hit Box A general term for any attack box, hurt box, or the unseen geometry in fighting game character that controls interaction with other characters on screen.
Hurt Box The hit boxes that determine the vulnerable area on and around a character.
Mashing Hitting buttons and directional inputs at random and as fast as possible. While no move or technique explicitly requires this tactic in Skullgirls, some players find mashing the easiest method to preform special moves and Blockbusters. Sometimes mashing gets you a combo! Use at your own risk.
Meter A general term for the Dramatic Tension in Skullgirls, super meter in any other game, or the HUD gauge representing the resource.
Normal Any standing, crouching, or jumping attack preformed with an attack button and no other input.
Overhead A standing normal move that must be blocked high.
Point The active, currently player controlled character on a team. Can also refer to the character selected to fight first on a team.
Reversal Preforming an attack, typically an special move or Blockbuster move with start up invulnerability, on the first frame a character gets out of hit stun, block stun, or gets up from the ground.
Recovery The portion of any attack after it hits and the attack character return to a neutral state.
Runaway A style of play, usually specific to the player, that centers around staying as far away from the opponent as possible to the point where they are out of range to attack back.
Rushdown A style of play, specific to the player or the character, that centers around going to the opponent and attacking as fast as possible.
Safe Performing a move in a way which doesn't allow the opponent to retaliate is considered safe. An attack that is safe on block tends to have a positive block advantage. Believing in yourself wins less games than being safe.
Start up The portion of any attack after the animation starts but before it hits.
Special move Any move preformed by a specific directional motion or sequence before pressing a single attack button.
Super move A move preformed by a specific directional motion or sequence before pressing two of the same attack button. Supers consume one or more stocks of a super meter and create a super flash effect before their active frames. Super moves are called Blockbusters in Skullgirls.
Taunt Any meaningless, harmless, or counter productive movement or action that intentionally gives the opponent an opportunity to hit the taunting player for free. Typically done as an insult to the opponent. Some characters have taunts give a boost when performed successfully.
Training Dummy The inactive character that appears as an opponent in a training mode. Sometimes used as a derogatory term for a living, but equally helpless, player.
Turtling A style of play, usually specific to the player, that attempts to win with as much defense and as little offense as possible.
Whiff An attack that does not hit the opponent or the act of missing an opponent with an attack. A "whiff cancel" will typically reduce the recovery on a whiffed normal move by canceling it with special move.
Zoning A style of play, specific to the player or the character, that centers around restricting the opponent to a specific distance or position on the screen.

Terms From Other Fighting Games

These terms, concepts, and techniques all appeared in other fighting games first, but can be useful when talking about Skullgirls. Players with experience in older games may find themselves more comfortable using the older vocabulary.

Term Definition
Advancing Guard Term from the Marvel vs Capcom series for a defensive technique similar to Pushblock in Skullgirls.
Alpha Counter A Street Fighter series attack where the defending player can attack during block stun at the cost of some super meter. This technique is functionally similar to a Stunt Double in Skullgirls.
Assist Term from the Marvel vs Capcom series for a mechanic similar to an Ensemble in Skullgirls.
Auto Guard The King of Fighters and Guilty Gear series attack property that allows the attack to block or absorb one or more hits during start up frames. This is functionally similar to Armored.png in Skullgirls.
Break Term from many other fighting games for a throw tech.
Breaker An an attack that can execute during hit stun and interrupt an opponent's combo in progress. These techniques are analogous to an Infinity Breaker in Skullgirls. Originally used in Killer Instinct's "C-C-Combo Breaker!" Sometimes seen in Mortal Kombat.
Burst A Blaz Blue and Guilty Gear series attack that, among other functions, can execute during hit stun and interrupt an opponent's combo in progress. This is analogous to an Infinity Breaker in Skullgirls.
Crossover Counter Term from the Marvel vs Capcom series for a tag out/counter attack technique similar to a Stunt Double in Skullgirls.
Dead Angle A Guilty Gear series attack where the defending player can attack during block stun at the cost of some tension. This technique is functionally similar to a Stunt Double in Skullgirls.
DHC Term from the Marvel vs Capcom series meaning Delayed Hyper Combo. A DHC involves a tag out during a super move, much like a Blockbuster Sequel in Skullgirls.
Double Over Stun Term from mostly 3D fighting games for a stun that causes the opponent to fall to the ground slowly, vulnerable to further attacks. These are very similar to a Crumple.png effect in Skullgirls.
Drive In Blaz Blue, the Drive button preforms character specific attacks. If the character has any techniques or tactics that no other character has, they tend to use the D button. The HP button in Skullgirls has some similarities to the D button in Blaz Blue.
Dust In the Guilty Gear series, the Dust button can perform an overhead Launch.png , equivalent of a Sweep.png, or unique attacks specific to a character. These techniques exist in Skullgirls but are not necessarily on the same button.
Guts A typically Japanese, alternate term for a damage scaling effect.
Hard Knockdown Term from many fighting games for an extended Knockdown.png state that does not allow the defending player to use a Ground Recovery or similar technique. A Slide.png is the closest thing to a hard knockdown in Skullgirls.
Hyper Combo Term from the Marvel vs Capcom series for a super move.
Instant Block Term from the Guilty Gear series for a timed block that reduces overall block stun. In practice, this is very similar to Pushblock in Skullgirls.
Just Frame Term from the Tekken series for a move requiring an input in a extremely small, often 1f, window in order to execute properly. Although no single moves require these inputs in Skullgirls, combos often do.
Kara Meaning "empty" in Japanese, kara typically refers to a move that starts but gets cancelled into another move before active frames. A "kara cancel" typically enhances the range of a throw or special move by canceling the first frames of start up of specific normal move. A "kara throw" cancels a normal attack to a normal throw. In Skullgirls this is only possible with LP and LK attacks, the same buttons used for normal throws. Normals can freely cancel to special moves and Blockbusters during start up, which has an effect similar to kara canceling and much easier timing.
Ratio Term from the Capcom vs SNK series to indicate team size dependent life and damage bonus for a character. This is analogous to the bonuses to life and damage given by team size selection in Skullgirls.
Red life Term from the Marvel vs Capcom series synonymous with recoverable damage in Skullgirls.
Square jump Term from the Marvel vs Capcom series for a movement very similar to an IAD.
Striker Term from the King of Fighters series for a mechanic similar to an Ensemble in Skullgirls.
Super Armor Term from various games for systems similar to the Armored.png property in Skullgirls. Sometimes "Hyper Armor" shows up when Super Armor just isn't enough.
Tech In addition to being shorthand for a Throw Tech, teching may refer to the equivalent of Ground Recovery or even Pushblock in other fighting games.
Tech Hit Term from the Darkstalkers series for a defensive technique similar to Pushblock in Skullgirls.
Ultra Term from Street Fighter 4, similar to a Blockbuster in Skullgirls.
Undizzy An unseen meter from the Marvel vs Capcom series that builds for the defending character during a combo and offers an escape, similar to Drama in Skullgirls.
Wire Term from the King of Fighters series for an attack that creates an effect very similar to a Wallbounce.png in Skullgirls.


Skullgirls 2nd Encore+
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